Many place-name adjectives and many demonyms also refer to various other things, sometimes with and sometimes without one or more additional words. The ending -man has feminine equivalent -woman (e.g.

To get you started, here’s a list of demonyms for every country, along with some colloquial terms for them. In other countries the origins are often disputed. the English, the Cornish). I live in France in french the correct is “étasunien”. Think you understand these various country demonyms? Several linguistic elements are used to create demonyms in the English language. ", https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_adjectivals_and_demonyms_for_cities&oldid=986767436, Short description is different from Wikidata, Articles needing additional references from July 2010, All articles needing additional references, All articles with specifically marked weasel-worded phrases, Articles with specifically marked weasel-worded phrases from March 2020, Articles lacking reliable references from June 2018, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, Barisali, Borishali, Barisailla, Borishailla, Belfastie, Belfaster, Belfastian, Belfastite, Chittagonian, Chottogrami, Chatigaiya, Sitainga, Chittagainga, Hongkonger, Hongkongish, Honger, HongKongese, Honkey, Mymensinghi, Mymensinghiya, Mymensinghiyo, Perthite, Perthian, Perthling, Perthonality, Pertho/Perthie, Perthite, Perthian, Perthling, Perthonality, Perthette, Prishtinali, Prishtina, Prištinci, Prištevci, Saint Petersburgian, (Saint) Petersburger, This page was last edited on 2 November 2020, at 22:01.

the term america is being used politically, geographically and historically incorrect…. In the United States such informal demonyms frequently become associated with mascots of the intercollegiate sports teams of the state university system. However, it may not work in all cases (like Dutch for people of the Netherlands), so get to know the demonyms! [8] The word did not appear for nouns, adjectives, and verbs derived from geographical names in the Merriam-Webster Collegiate Dictionary nor in prominent style manuals such as the Chicago Manual of Style.

For example, a person of the Luba people would be a Muluba, the plural form Baluba, and the language, Kiluba or Tshiluba. Share: Facebook Twitter Pinterest Email LinkedIn.

Allemanni, Helvetii). In almost every case, the Japanese demonym can be made simply by adding jin (人), the Chinese character reading for "person," to the end of the Japanese place name. The internet makes it a breeze to figure out demonyms.

That being said, it did originate in the Punjab area of the northern Indian subcontinent, where it is still the predominant religion there.

A common practice is to use a city's name as if it were an adjective, as in "Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra", "Melbourne suburbs", etc.

an Irishman and a Scotswoman).

Here, we go over demonyms and give you a list of demonyms by country.

Take some of our Demonyms Quizzes and find out!

Examples of demonyms include Cochabambino, for someone from the city of Cochabamba; American for a person from the country called the United States of America; and Swahili, for a person of the Swahili coast. Wow, that makes complete sense, and is actually quite apparent, if you think about it. [3] Demonyms are used to designate all people (general population) of a particular place, regardless of ethnic, linguistic, religious or other cultural differences that may exist within the population of that place. Where an adjective is a link, the link is to the language or dialect of the same name.

an Irishman and a Scotswoman). Often used for Middle Eastern locations and European locations. Notable examples are cheeses, cat breeds, dog breeds, and horse breeds. The following is a list of adjectival and demonymic forms of countries and … Summary: A demonym is the adjectival word that describes the people of a particular place.

I am not saying that is what is used on daily basis but the tendency to say ” I’m from America the greatest country in the world” “Let’s make America great again” and so on… In my opinion it is encouraging ignorance. American Demonym: Why Do US Citizens Call Themselves Americans. Many demonyms come easy, but many are way tougher to fathom than that.

Since names of places, regions and countries (toponyms) are morphologically often related to names of ethnic groups (ethnonyms), various ethnonyms may have similar, but not always identical forms as terms for general population of those places, regions or countries (demonyms). Demonym Explanation & List of Demonyms for Different Cities & Countries. A person from New York, such as myself, is a New Yorker; a person from Bolivia can be called a Bolivian. Regional and Local Demonyms, by Islands.

In the English language, there are many polysemic words that have several meanings (including demonymic and ethonymic uses), and therefore a particular use of any such word depends on the context. National Geographic attributes the term "demonym" to Merriam-Webster editor Paul Dickson in a recent work from 1990.

Singular forms simply remove the final 's' or, in the case of -ese endings, are the same as the plural forms. So can those ending in -ch / -tch (e.g. Some demonyms may have several meanings. As a sub-field of anthroponymy, the study of demonyms is called demonymy or demonymics.

the adjective Czech does not qualify as its -ch is pronounced /k/). [example needed]. [4] Often, they are the same as the adjectival form of the place, e.g. The following is a list of adjectival forms of cities in English and their demonymic equivalents, which denote the people or the inhabitants of these cities.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_language_regulators On a country level: Demonyms may also not conform to the underlying naming of a particular place, but instead arise out of historical or cultural particularities that become associated with its denizens.

Similar patterns with minor variations in the prefixes exist throughout on a tribal level. -i is encountered also in Latinate names for the various people that ancient Romans encountered (e.g.

the French, the Dutch) provided they are pronounced with a 'ch' /tʃ/ sound (e.g.

Don't forget about our trail renaming contest", "Massachusetts: General Laws, Section 35", https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Demonym&oldid=986970336, Articles with unsourced statements from April 2013, Articles needing examples from December 2018, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, This page was last edited on 4 November 2020, at 01:45.

Wikipedia is a good source; simply go to the city or country of which demonym you are wondering about, and they should have it on the right-hand side, within the shaded info box (if one exists). "Attic" is usually used only in reference to. The plural forms are usually "-os" and "-as", respectively.

The English language has never had a formal regulator anywhere explains why; In English, demonyms are always capitalized. A demonym (/ˈdɛmənɪm/; from Ancient Greek δῆμος, dêmos, "people, tribe" and ὄνυμα, ónuma, "name") or gentilic (from Latin gentilis, "of a clan, or gens")[1] is a word that identifies a group of people (inhabitants, residents, natives) in relation to a particular place.

Demonyms are usually derived from the name of the place (village, city, region, province, state, continent). [5][6][7] Often, in practice, the demonym for states, provinces or cities is simply the name of the place, treated as an adjective; for instance, Kennewick Man.

The ending -man has feminine equivalent -woman (e.g. The term for the people of La Paz, Bolivia, is a Paceño. Examples include Tolkien's Rohirrim (from Rohan) and the Star Trek franchise's Klingons (with various names for their homeworld).

The following is a list of adjectival forms of cities in English and their demonymic equivalents, which denote the people or the inhabitants of these cities.

Dauntless Jaunter is a travel website committed to promoting socially-conscious, culturally-aware, educational, and enlightening sort of travel, as well as the importance and lifelong value of such travel. The most common is to add a suffix to the end of the location name, slightly modified in some instances.

The following is a list of adjectival forms of cities in English and their demonymic equivalents, which denote the people or the inhabitants of these cities.. Demonyms ending in -ese are the same in the singular and plural forms..

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Conversely, some groups of people may be associated with multiple demonyms. Often used for Italian and East Asian, from the Italian suffix -ese, which is originally from the Latin adjectival ending -ensis, designating origin from a place: thus Hispaniensis (Spanish), Danensis (Danish), etc.

Often used for Italian and French locations. https://www.thoughtco.com/the-names-of-nationalities-4088817 For example, a native of the United Kingdom may be called a British person, a Briton or, informally, a Brit.

New online tool will tell you", "Investing in Future Quiet, Quiet Manhattan Apartments Next to Construction Sites", "Copquin explains "Queensites" for New York Times - Yale Press Log", "Waterluvians!

The use in demonyms for Francophone locations is motivated by the similar-sounding French suffix -ais(e), which is at least in part a relative (< lat.

For example, word Thai may be used as a demonym, designating any inhabitant of Thailand, while the same word may also be used as an ethnonym, designating members of the Thai people.

Examples include Lilliputians and Brobdingnagians, from the islands of Lilliput and Brobdingnag in the satire Gulliver's Travels. The following is a partial list of adjectival forms of place names in English … Adjetivos Gentilicios", "What makes a Coventrian ?

A bit tough to guess that one, were you not familiar with naming conventions of the Spanish language. [2] Demonyms are usually derived from the name of the place (village, city, region, province, state, continent). While derived from French, these are also official demonyms in English.

There are many times when you might already be familiar with the adjectival term for the people of a city or country or region, or you may be able to deduce it fairly easily, adding an “-er” or “-ian” suffix to the name. In much of East Africa, a person of a particular ethnic group will be denoted by a prefix.

Used to identify those bi- or multilingual citizens merely belonging to Brussels. Literature and science fiction have created a wealth of gentilics that are not directly associated with a cultural group. Not to be confused with the movements and concepts of, Not to be confused with the inhabitants of, "List of adjectivals and demonyms for cities", Learn how and when to remove this template message, List of adjectival and demonymic forms of place names, List of adjectivals and demonyms for astronomical bodies, List of adjectivals and demonyms for continental regions, List of adjectivals and demonyms for subcontinental regions, List of adjectival and demonymic forms for countries and nations, List of adjectivals and demonyms for Australia, List of adjectivals and demonyms for Canada, List of adjectivals and demonyms for India, List of adjectivals and demonyms for Malaysia, List of adjectivals and demonyms for Mexico, List of adjectivals and demonyms for New Zealand, List of adjectivals and demonyms for the Philippines, List of adjectivals and demonyms for the United States, List of adjectivals and demonyms for Colorado cities, List of adjectivals and demonyms for former regions, List of adjectivals and demonyms for Greco-Roman antiquity, List of adjectivals and demonyms for fictional regions, "Town Tradition Goads Residents Into Donations", "Old Torontonian: If He Likes Toronto So Much, Why Live Here? You mentioned Spanish in Spanish the correct/ proper name for citizens from the US is “estadounidense”. Thus, it is not a demonym, but rather an adjective for a person following a religion, like a Christian. A demonym is the adjectival word that describes the people of the place in question.